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IsoLab undergraduate lab experience

IsoLab employs undergraduate students interested in gaining laboratory and research experiences. Undergraduates are crucial to the success of IsoLab. IsoLab hires students early in their study, provides a competative salary, and retains students until graduation. Interested undergraduates at the University of Washington are encouraged to contact the lab manager or the lab Principal Investigators and provide a resumé and summary of interest. Undergraduate students are valued and supported by IsoLab for their diligence and hardwork that results in improved techniques and greater productivity.

Max cleaning lab glassware
Max cleaning lab glassware
Joel cleaning lab glassware
Joel cleaning lab glassware
IsoLab prepares undergraduates with training in safety, communication, collaboration, experimental design and laboratory practices. It is critical that students are detail oriented, learn proper laboratory hand skills, and follow all safety protocols. IsoLab undergraduates are expected to prioritize coursework, typically working ten hours per week and never exceeding twenty hours while classes are in session. Students define their own schedules depending on their coursework and responsibilities.

Erin with safety in mind
Erin with safety in mind
Max at the microbalance
Max at the microbalance
Josh pipetting bacterial media
Josh pipetting bacterial media
Undergraduates in IsoLab gain skills in advanced isotope geochemistry methods, assess data quality, and utilize data analysis tools like Matlab, R, or python.

Josh preparing the elemental analyzer
Josh preparing the elemental analyzer
Erin sealing glass ampuole
Erin sealing glass ampuole
Undergraduate students may work closely with IsoLab Principal Investigators and / or graduate students and when undergraduate contributions are significant are included as coauthors on resulting publications. Examples include L. Easley in Zatko M., Erbland J., Savarino J., Geng L., Easley L., Schauer A. J., Bates T., Quinn P. K., Light B., Morison D., Osthoff H. D., Lyman S., Neff W., Yuan B. and Alexander B. (2016) The magnitude of the snow-sourced reactive nitrogen flux to the boundary layer in the Uintah Basin, Utah, USA. Atmos. Chem. Phys. 16, 13837-13851, K. Samek in Steig E. J., Gkinis V, Schauer A.J., Schoenemann SW, Samek K, Hoffnagle J, Dennis KJ, Tan SM. Calibrated high-precision 17O-excess measurements using cavity ring-down spectroscopy with laser-current-tuned cavity resonance, Atmos. Meas. Tech., 7, 2421-2435, doi:10.5194 / amt-7-2421-2014 (2014.), and H. Amos in Alexander B., Allman DJ, Amos HM, Fairlie TD, Dachs J, Hegg DA, Sletten RS. Isotopic constraints on sulfate aerosol formation pathways in the marine boundary layer of the subtropical northeast Atlantic Ocean. J. Geophys. Res.117, D06304, doi:10.1029/2011JD016773 (2012).

Crowdfunding Scientific Research: Spotlight on Maria Zatko in IsoLab

Maria Zatko used this mass spectrometer in her crowdfunded research project when she was a Ph.D. student at the University of Washington in Seattle. Image credit: LAUREN EASLEY
Maria Zatko used this IsoLab mass spectrometer in her crowdfunded research project when she was a Ph.D. student at the UW in Seattle.
Image credit: LAUREN EASLEY


Want to crowdfund your science? New study hints at who is successful. Atmospheric scientist Maria Zatko was close to completing her thesis on ground-level ozone in 2014 when she learned of a perfect opportunity to fill a gap in her research on this air pollutant...

Read more: https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2018/03/want-crowdfund-your-science-new-study-hints-who-successful

Read the paper: https://www.nber.org/papers/w24402

New Article in Nature by Becky Alexander

Becky Alexander in the cold room of the UW’s IsoLab with sections of an ice core. Her group is now analyzing ice cores from Antarctica to see if they show the same trend as in Greenland. Image credit: Mark Stone/University of Washington
Becky Alexander in the cold room of the UW’s IsoLab with sections of an ice core. Her group is now analyzing ice cores from Antarctica to see if they show the same trend as in Greenland. Image credit: Mark Stone/University of Washington


Isotopic evidence of multiple controls on atmospheric oxidants over climate transitions
The abundance of tropospheric oxidants, such as ozone (O3) and hydroxyl (OH) and peroxy radicals (HO2 + RO2), determines the lifetimes of reduced trace gases such as methane and the production of particulate matter important for climate and human health...

Read more from UW Today: http://www.washington.edu/news/2017/05/17/earths-atmosphere-more-chemically-reactive-in-cold-climates/

Read the paper: http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nature22340.html

New Article in Nature by Eric Steig

Turner et al. report that the peninsula has cooled during the past 20 years. Image credit: Tom Tobin
Turner et al. report that the peninsula has cooled during the past 20 years. Image credit: Tom Tobin


Climate science: Cooling in the Antarctic
The Antarctic Peninsula has been warming for many decades, but an analysis now reveals that it has cooled since the late 1990s. Inspection of the factors involved suggests that this is consistent with natural variability.

Read more: http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v535/n7612/full/535358a.html